About

Black rhino on LewaFounded in 1995, the not-for-profit Lewa Wildlife Conservancy (LWC) spans 62,000 acres and serves as a catalyst for conservation across northern Kenya. Lewa holds 12% of Kenya’s black rhino population and the largest single population of Grevy’s zebras in the world.  Through the protection and management of endangered species, the initiation and support of community conservation and development programmes, and the education of neighbouring areas in the value of wildlife, Lewa has become Kenya’s leading model for wildlife conservation on private land, leading destination for low-impact conservation tourism, and leading catalyst for conservation, and its direct benefits for communities, across the region. One of LWC’s fundamental objectives is to conserve threatened species within its area of operation and provide protected habitat for other species under pressure outside of LWC. LWC promotes conservation both within its boundaries and in the ecologically important community-owned areas to its North (under the NRT). LWC also provides support to anti-poaching operations in other private rhino sanctuaries and wildlife reserves in Laikipia District and on Mt. Kenya.

Cheetah on LewaLWC has a far reaching impact beyond the conservation of biodiversity within the confines of the Conservancy.  The Conservancy is also home to the Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT) offices. LWC also provides security and logistical support to the NRT.  The NRT is an innovative partnership with a number of communities to the North who put land aside for wildlife conservation. It provides support to local communities through employment, education, health-care, enterprise and development projects which all work towards improving livelihoods and alleviating poverty.  LWC was instrumental in creating the NRT which has increased the amount of land under integrated conservation management to 2 million acres allowing wildlife to begin to migrate once again throughout their historical natural range.

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